Barber County Kansas

Howard Judson Parker

Branding cattle in the summer of 1898 or 1899 on Howard J. Parker's Cedar Creek Ranch near Medicine Lodge, Kansas.

Arthur Parker is on horse at left; Howard J. Parker is 2nd from left; Walter Parker has the steer's tail.

Photo courtesy of Bob Osborn.
Branding cattle in the summer of 1898 or 1899 on Howard J. Parker's Cedar Creek Ranch near Medicine Lodge, Kansas.
Arthur Parker is on horse at left; Howard J. Parker is 2nd from left; Walter Parker has the steer's tail.
Photo courtesy of Bob Osborn.


The Barber County Index, July 13, 1939.

HOWARD JUDSON PARKER, OLD TIME RESIDENT, DIES

Howard Judson Parker died last Friday after a brief illness, following a residence of some sixty two years in Barber county.

Mr. Parker was one of the oldest of the "Old Timers" living in Barber county. He first came here as a cowboy driving cattle on the old Chisholm Trail from Texas to Abilene, Kansas, at the age of 19 - in 1869. He drove on the Chisholm Trail for three summers, and spent the falls and winters of those years buffalo hunting and shipping the hides. He was shipping buffalo hides out of Dodge City before Medicine Lodge was established as a town, and it was only a small village when Mr. Parker settled on the old Parker ranch on Cedar Creek in 1877.

He preempted the first 160 acres of that ranch of 2000 acres and lived there fifty years as a stockman. He was among the first of the early day cattlemen to breed up his range herd which he finally developed into the pure bred Aberdeen Angus cattle. He was a great lover of horses and had owned some of the best saddle horses to be found in the country.

OBITUARY

Howard Judson Parker, son of Thomas Henderson Parker and Mary Joanne Parker was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on December 21st, 1850 and died at Medicine Lodge, Kansas, July 7th 1939, at the age of 89 years, 6 months, and 16 days.

In early childhood he moved with his parents to Hillsborough, Ohio, where he grew to early manhood. In 1867 he came to Kansas and spent several years as a cowboy riding the ranges and hunting buffalo. He returned to Hillsborough in 1875 and was united in marriage to Viletta Marie Zink. They came to Kansas and lived near Marion until the spring of 1877 when they moved to Barber County, settling on the old homestead 8 1/2 miles south west of Medicine Lodge.

To this union were born 10 children all of whom are living. He was preceded in death by his wife who died February 25, 1922. The surviving relatives are the ten children; Thomas Leroy, of Waupun, Wisconsin; Arthur P. of Hudson, Wyoming; Mrs. Stella Mosler, Winfield, Kansas; Edward W. of Lander, Wyoming; Mrs. Anna Clarke, Medicine Lodge; Walter G., Ft. Branche, Indiana; John Henry, Independence, Kansas; Mrs. Amy Richardson, Wichita, Kansas; Robert N. Hudson, Wyoming; and Oliver Z., of Shawnee, Oklahoma, one brother, Abbott Parker, West___rd, Texas, 36 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren and numerous relatives and friends.

Card of Thanks

We wish to extend our thanks to our friends and neighbors for their sympathy and help, also for the floral offerings during our recent bereavement. They were much appreciated.

Mrs. Stella M. Mosler.
Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Parker and son, Leroy.
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Clarke and son, Russell.
John H. Parker.
Mrs. Amy Richardson.
O. Z. Parker and son, Wilson.
Frank Parker.


Howard J. Parker, at right, with two unidentified men.

They were probably dressed for the Medicine Lodge Peace Treaty Pageant.

Photo courtesy of Bob Osborn.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE.
Howard J. Parker, at right, with two unidentified men.
They were probably dressed for the Medicine Lodge Peace Treaty Pageant.
Photo courtesy of Bob Osborn.

Cedar Creek Ranch near Medicine Lodge, Kansas, 1908.

H.J. Parker, proprieter.

Photo courtesy of Bob Osborn.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE.
Cedar Creek Ranch near Medicine Lodge, Kansas, 1908. H.J. Parker, proprieter.
Photo courtesy of Bob Osborn.
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Injured by Horse -- H. J. Parker brought his boy, Robert, about 10 years old, to town yesterday to have Dr. Kociell amputate the end of his finger. Robert was feeding corn to a horse and the horse got hold of his finger as well as the corn, and crushed the end of it. Dr. Kociell did a neat job of it and the boy is getting along all right. Barber County Index, August 5, 1903. (SB)


The preliminary trial of Robt. Jesse and Al Coble, charged with assault with intent to kill Howard Parker, was heard before Justice Morris Monday and resulted in the binding over of the defendants to the District Court in the sum of $300 each. G.M. Martin has been employed by Mr. Parker to assist the county attorney, and Ellis & Ellis represent the defendants. -- Medicine Lodge Cresset, __ May 1899.

Article courtesy of Ellen Bisson and Kim Fowles.


Thanks to Shirley Brier for finding, transcribing and contributing the above news article to this web site! Thanks to Bob Osborn for contributing the above photos and to Kim Fowles for arranging the contribution!




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